GNS Healthcare Blog

GNS Healthcare Blog

GNS Healthcare Primary Blog

By December 31, 1969

Answering the Elusive “Why” is Possible in Healthcare…If You Use the Right Type of AI

Between 2006 and 2016 there were over 2 million scholarly articles published around the globe. Of those, more than 25 percent – 568,000 – were focused on medicine, more than double the next area of study¹.

Despite the spike in medical knowledge, there is still a struggle to understand why some  treatments work while others do not and the reality is that there is still much we don’t know.

In recent years, there has been equal parts hope and hype over Artificial Intelligence (AI) and how to use it to unravel human disease more quickly and efficiently. In a recent article in Forbes,...

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Immunotherapy and AI: Advancing Our View of Cancer Treatment

Most allergy sufferers know that receiving a series of allergy shots can prevent sniffling, sneezing, and red eyes. But not everyone is aware of how it actually works. The shots contain a very small amount of the allergen, the thing that is causing the problem. While the allergen introduced into the system isn’t enough to cause sickness, it does set off an alarm telling the body’s immune system it’s time to get to work. Over time, the doses get larger and eventually help the body develop a tolerance to the allergen. In other words, the body becomes immune to the invader.

This concept is a...

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Democratizing Data: How Visualization is Expanding Data's Impact

Striving to effectively communicate thoughts and ideas has been an aim of humans since the dawn of time. The Cro-Magnons used charcoal to scrawl paintings on cave walls 40,000 years ago. Egyptians used hieroglyphics and the Chinese created logograms to represent words. In more modern times, organizers of the 1964 Tokyo Olympic games used symbols for sports for the first time to better communicate with an international audience.

Throughout history, the goal has always been to find the best ways to communicate. Inevitably, the solution has been the same: a picture is worth a thousand words....

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Unstructured Data: Joining the Healthcare Party

The U. S. healthcare industry now produces an estimated 1.2 billion clinical care documents a year. Within those documents is an amazing amount of detail on an individual patient’s care plan, medical history and overall health.  So why is this type of data, not often touted, important? When analyzed, this detailed patient data has the potential to improve healthcare outcomes. The only problem is that about eighty percent of that data is unstructured¹.

Longitudinal data – data that includes all healthcare encounters of a patient or member over a continuum of care and time – is critically...

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Tracking Digital Health Innovations: Another Step Toward Personalized Medicine

Do you fasten your Fitbit, smartwatch or other wearable device onto your wrist every morning and diligently track the number of steps taken or miles biked throughout the day? Perhaps you use an app on your smartphone to analyze your sleep patterns or as a reminder to take a vitamin or a medication. If you’re not using technology to track these activities, chances are you know someone who is.

According to eMarketer’s latest projection, over 50 million Americans are wearing some type of device that captures health information at least once a month. That represents almost one out of every...

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The Promise and the Power of In Silico Clinical Trials

Clinical leaders at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute for Neuro-Oncology were becoming more frustrated with the lack of treatment options for patients suffering from glioblastoma (GBM). The aggressive form of brain cancer, which recently claimed the life of Senator John McCain, is one of the deadliest forms of cancer and has no known cure. Most people diagnosed with the disease die within 15 months and a meager 15 percent survive past five years¹.

Not satisfied with the slow pace of traditional randomized controlled trials studying GBM, Dr. Brian M. Alexander at Dana-Farber decided to act. A...

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The Promise of Precision Medicine is Not Misleading, It’s Just Beginning

Last week, an op-ed was published in the New York Times that asked an important question: Are patients being misled by the promise of precision medicine? The article, which focused on the treatment of various forms of cancer, posited that the successes achieved through precision medicine are relatively few when compared to its failures¹.

Precision medicine is a term that has been trending for several years (just try googling it). Previously, the healthcare industry had tried other avenues to produce better outcomes at lower costs. While the hype around what precision medicine can achieve...

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Making the Case for Data Diversity

The power and effectiveness of artificial intelligence (AI) and its continued integration into everyday life is becoming more widely accepted. This is especially true in healthcare where researchers are making significant strides in identifying the causes of and providing more effective treatments for major diseases.

But among these successes is a question of whether some AI results may be biased. A recent article in Fast Company acknowledges that AI should be “the great equalizer” because it is all about objective math and calculations. But the article raises the question of “creator...

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A Few Fun Facts to Warm Your Labor Day

For most of us, the first Monday in September marks a day off from work and a last chance to gather with friends and family before summer is replaced by the chill of fall. Our barbecues and fireworks are a far cry from the first Labor Day celebrated in 1882, when a parade of 10,000 workers in New York City went on strike to protest the 58-hour work week that was common at the time.

It took until 1894 for Labor Day to be declared a federal holiday and until 1916 for the Adamson Act to establish the eight-hour work day. It is thanks to the efforts of these early laborers that we have...

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Are value-based contracts the end of the journey or just a stop along the way?

The drive to value-based care has become a significant issue for biopharma companies as more health plans request value-based contracts. According to McKinsey, over 200 of these innovative contracts have been publicly disclosed since 1994¹. The buzz around the biopharma industry is that these value-based contracts are the wave of the future. Although this trend is likely to continue in the immediate future, the shift to these types of contracts may not survive in the long term. Precision medicine may make them obsolete.

 

Types of innovative biopharma contracts

The two most prevalent types...

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